Patient Support & Care Coordination
Collapse 22q: An Overview

This course will provide the participant with all relevant background regarding the etiology, frequency, recurrence risk, and resultant features associated with the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, as well as, recommended standard of care in screening and follow-up for children and adults based on international healthcare guidelines.

 

Continuing Education

Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. This on-demand course will be eligible through September 26, 2020.

  • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Introductory Level, Professional Area).
  • NCNA/ANCC: This continuing nursing education activity was approved by the North Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. 
Original Seminar Date: September 27, 2018
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • NCNA Nursing CEUs: 1 hour Nursing Contact Hours
  • ASHA: 0.10 hours CEUs

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO 22q: An Overview
    Collapse Challenging Multilingual/Multicultural Cleft Cases in the U.S. and Abroad
    Original Seminar Date: October 17, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
    MORE INFOMORE INFO Challenging Multilingual/Multicultural Cleft Cases in the U.S. and Abroad
    Collapse Ethical Issues in Cleft Care

    This course provides a case based discussion of ethical principles applied to cleft patients. Caring for patients with cleft and craniofacial anomalies can bring up many ethical issues. Addressing these ethical issues is critical to the success of a patient-centered multidisciplinary approach and successful patient care.

    Continuing Education 

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. This on-demand course will be eligible through October 29, 2020. 

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. 

    • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Introductory Level, Professional Area). 

    • NCNA/ANCC: This continuing nursing education activity was approved by the North Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. To receive contact hours nurses must attend 80% of this CNE activity.

    Neither the speakers nor members of the planning committee have any conflicts of interest related to the content of this activity.  Individual disclosures may be found in the “Topics” tab under their name.

    Original Seminar Date: October 29, 2018
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • NCNA Nursing CEUs: 1 hour Nursing Contact Hours
  • ASHA: 0.10 hours CEUs

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Ethical Issues in Cleft Care
    Collapse Parenting a Child with Cleft Lip and/or Palate: Behavioral, School, and Social Considerations

    This course is for families of children born with a cleft lip and/or palate and draws upon the psychosocial literature and providers' clinical experience for the topics of addressing behavioral adjustment, school concerns, and social skills. Suggestions and strategies for families are discussed to promote their children's positive psychological outcomes.

    This course does not provide continuing education credit for professionals.

    Original Seminar Date: July 20, 2018
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
    MORE INFOMORE INFO Parenting a Child with Cleft Lip and/or Palate: Behavioral, School, and Social Considerations
    Collapse Promoting positive psychosocial outcomes in craniofacial team care: Strategies for non-mental health providers

    This webinar outlines the nature, prevalence, and variation in psychosocial issues across developmental phases, and how these issues can be addressed using a patient-centered multidisciplinary approach. Topics include: how to facilitate psychological adjustment in parents, how to address teasing and bullying, how to promote positive outcomes in school, how to support informed medical decision-making, how to handle periods of transition, and how to use available screening measures to assess and monitor patients' well being. The webinar provides practical suggestions which all team disciplines can apply in practice.

     

    Continuing Education 

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. This on-demand course will be eligible through October 24, 2020. 

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. 

    • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Introductory Level, Professional Area). 

    • NCNA/ANCC: This continuing nursing education activity was approved by the North Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. To receive contact hours nurses must attend 80% of this CNE activity.

    Neither the speakers nor members of the planning committee have any conflicts of interest related to the content of this activity.  Individual disclosures may be found in the “Topics” tab under their name.

    Original Seminar Date: October 24, 2018
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • NCNA Nursing CEUs: 1 hour Nursing Contact Hours
  • ASHA: 0.10 hours CEUs

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Promoting positive psychosocial outcomes in craniofacial team care: Strategies for non-mental health providers
    Collapse Transition of Care for Young Adults with Cleft Lip and Palate: We

    Background and purpose: For many young adults with cleft lip and palate (CLP), traditional team services come to an abrupt end at age 18, necessitating a transition from child-centered to adult-centered care. There is a shift in focus from the cleft itself and clinician reported outcomes to patient self-report about the perceived impact of the cleft. Transition also befalls the parents and team providers. We propose an evidence-based person-centered delivery model of care using the concepts of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) (WHO, 2001, 2004). The ICF represents a shift from health condition and body impairment-centered descriptions of disability to a more comprehensive documentation, including a wider range of functionality indicators. This model of Transition of Care is proposed to facilitate a positive shift from pediatric to adult-centered care. It is timely for teams to embrace the concept of transition of care, and to provide services that recognize the importance of personal and environmental factors in facilitating holistic transition planning and service delivery (ICF, WHO, 2001), which are developmentally appropriate to young adults with CLP (Farre & McDonagh, 2017; Farre et al., 2016).
    The purpose of this proposed evidence based model is to provide a framework for redesigning the way services are delivered to a young adult with CLP. The concepts of this model are relevant to all specialists on the cleft palate team. The aim of this presentation is to create an awareness of young adults with CL/P who are generally a neglected population in terms of team care and to suggest a new and fresh approach to service delivery to these individuals with the emphasis on clinical resources.

    Content: A brief overview of adolescents and young adults with CLP and their multidisciplinary needs will be presented. A framework for a holistic service delivery model developed by Vallino and Louw (2017) will be presented. We will suggest strategies for teams to improve the care for young adults with CLP and share a clinical toolbox comprised of a compendium of resources.
    Conclusion: The proposed Service Delivery Model for young adults with CLP necessitates a change in perspective that embraces constructs such as person-centered care in order to ensure the best outcomes for these individuals. These concepts can be applied by all cleft palate team members. Adopting a life span perspective reinforces the understanding that living with and managing CLP is dynamic and that transition is a process rather than a point in a person's life. 

    Original Seminar Date: December 04, 2019
    MORE INFOMORE INFO Transition of Care for Young Adults with Cleft Lip and Palate: We