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Collapse ACPA Team Approval Information Session

This webinar will give an update on changes to the ACPA Team Approval Process and an overview of the 2019 application for ACPA Team Approval. Tips for preparing and completing the application will be provided. Attendees will gain a better understanding of the approval process and identify the key requirements needed for ACPA Team Approval. 

All members of ACPA Approved Teams and individuals interested in learning about the ACPA Team Approval process are invited to attend this webinar. Members of teams applying or re-applying for ACPA Team Approval in 2019 are encouraged to attend.

 

This webinar will be presented by Jamie Idelberg, BS, RDH and Celia Heppner, PsyD. Jamie is Chair of the Commission on Approval of Teams and Outreach Coordinator of the Children’s Hospital Colorado Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Program in Aurora, CO. Celia is Chair-Elect of the Commission on Approval of Teams and a team member of the Fogelson Plastic Surgery and Craniofacial Center for Children in Dallas, TX.

Original Seminar Date: April 25, 2019
On-Demand Release Date: April 26, 2019
MORE INFOMORE INFO ACPA Team Approval Information Session
Collapse Anatomy of The Unilateral Cleft Nasal Deformity and Its Correction

Audience members will understand the anatomic components of the Unilateral cleft lip nasal deformity. They will also be able to understand the aims and methods of primary surgical correction.

Original Seminar Date: October 23, 2019
MORE INFOMORE INFO Anatomy of The Unilateral Cleft Nasal Deformity and Its Correction
Collapse Challenging Multilingual/Multicultural Cleft Cases in the U.S. and Abroad
Original Seminar Date: October 17, 2019
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
MORE INFOMORE INFO Challenging Multilingual/Multicultural Cleft Cases in the U.S. and Abroad
Collapse Rebroadcast - Cleft Palate Speech Therapy: From Elicitation to Spontaneous Speech

Children with cleft palate (CP) and/or velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) often present with complex speech sound disorders. While surgery can facilitate a functional mechanism for the child to use, only speech therapy can correct the complex learned speech sound errors. The therapeutic process may be slow and labor intensive, requiring multiple years until normalization is achieved. There is no "therapy cookbook" that covers the diverse needs of the children with cleft or VPD, and what works for one child may not work for the next. Once a speech sound target has been elicited, the greatest challenge is habituating the sound in appropriate linguistic and phonemic contexts in the child's spontaneous speech. Failure of habituation results in impaired intelligibility and social stigma for the child. 

This course is designed for working clinicians in search of techniques for teaching and habituating consonants, or for those who teach or supervise clinicians in training, and is intended to be a forum for the exchange of ideas for speech therapy. It is presented by a panel of five speech pathologists who evaluate and treat children with cleft and VPD. An overview of motor learning theory will begin the study session, followed by individual and varied case studies in elicitation and habituation of particular phoneme targets. 

 

Continuing Education

Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit.  Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through July 11, 2020.

  • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate Level, Professional Area).
Original Seminar Date: April 23, 2019
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ASHA: 1 hour CEUs

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Rebroadcast - Cleft Palate Speech Therapy: From Elicitation to Spontaneous Speech
    Collapse The Importance of Early Identification and Treatment of Deformational Plagiocephaly/Brachycephaly and Congenital Muscular Torticollis

    Deformational plagiocephaly/brachycephaly (DPB) occurs in 16-19% of babies and 70-95% of these babies also have congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). Current theories state that the CMT occurs in the womb due to “packaging” causing the baby to develop a preferred position of turning their head in the opposite direction of the CMT. The skull is very soft and malleable; therefore, a preferred position often results in flattening and anteriorly displaces the ear, forehead and cheek. Although many families and PCP’s identify this issue at 1 or 2 months of age, the families are often told that DPB will resolve once the baby is rolling and sitting. Parents are very discouraged when this does not occur. Early intervention with conservative measures to include aggressive repositioning and physical therapy can be very effective. At our center, we have a team clinic with a nurse practitioner and a physical therapist seeing the patients referred for plagiocephaly/torticollis. The babies are evaluated for both diagnoses and treatment is initiated immediately often halting and/or reversing the progression and negating the need for helmet therapy.  

    Original Seminar Date: March 14, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
    MORE INFOMORE INFO The Importance of Early Identification and Treatment of Deformational Plagiocephaly/Brachycephaly and Congenital Muscular Torticollis
    Collapse Transition of Care for Young Adults with Cleft Lip and Palate: We

    Background and purpose: For many young adults with cleft lip and palate (CLP), traditional team services come to an abrupt end at age 18, necessitating a transition from child-centered to adult-centered care. There is a shift in focus from the cleft itself and clinician reported outcomes to patient self-report about the perceived impact of the cleft. Transition also befalls the parents and team providers. We propose an evidence-based person-centered delivery model of care using the concepts of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) (WHO, 2001, 2004). The ICF represents a shift from health condition and body impairment-centered descriptions of disability to a more comprehensive documentation, including a wider range of functionality indicators. This model of Transition of Care is proposed to facilitate a positive shift from pediatric to adult-centered care. It is timely for teams to embrace the concept of transition of care, and to provide services that recognize the importance of personal and environmental factors in facilitating holistic transition planning and service delivery (ICF, WHO, 2001), which are developmentally appropriate to young adults with CLP (Farre & McDonagh, 2017; Farre et al., 2016).
    The purpose of this proposed evidence based model is to provide a framework for redesigning the way services are delivered to a young adult with CLP. The concepts of this model are relevant to all specialists on the cleft palate team. The aim of this presentation is to create an awareness of young adults with CL/P who are generally a neglected population in terms of team care and to suggest a new and fresh approach to service delivery to these individuals with the emphasis on clinical resources.

    Content: A brief overview of adolescents and young adults with CLP and their multidisciplinary needs will be presented. A framework for a holistic service delivery model developed by Vallino and Louw (2017) will be presented. We will suggest strategies for teams to improve the care for young adults with CLP and share a clinical toolbox comprised of a compendium of resources.
    Conclusion: The proposed Service Delivery Model for young adults with CLP necessitates a change in perspective that embraces constructs such as person-centered care in order to ensure the best outcomes for these individuals. These concepts can be applied by all cleft palate team members. Adopting a life span perspective reinforces the understanding that living with and managing CLP is dynamic and that transition is a process rather than a point in a person's life. 

    Original Seminar Date: December 04, 2019
    MORE INFOMORE INFO Transition of Care for Young Adults with Cleft Lip and Palate: We