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Collapse ACPA Team Approval Information Session 2019

This webinar will give an update on changes to the ACPA Team Approval Process and an overview of the 2019 application for ACPA Team Approval. Tips for preparing and completing the application will be provided. Attendees will gain a better understanding of the approval process and identify the key requirements needed for ACPA Team Approval. 

All members of ACPA Approved Teams and individuals interested in learning about the ACPA Team Approval process are invited to attend this webinar. Members of teams applying or re-applying for ACPA Team Approval in 2019 are encouraged to attend.

 

This webinar will be presented by Jamie Idelberg, BS, RDH and Celia Heppner, PsyD. Jamie is Chair of the Commission on Approval of Teams and Outreach Coordinator of the Children’s Hospital Colorado Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Program in Aurora, CO. Celia is Chair-Elect of the Commission on Approval of Teams and a team member of the Fogelson Plastic Surgery and Craniofacial Center for Children in Dallas, TX.

Original Seminar Date: April 25, 2019
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
MORE INFOMORE INFO ACPA Team Approval Information Session 2019
Collapse Anatomy of The Unilateral Cleft Nasal Deformity and Its Correction

Audience members will understand the anatomic components of the Unilateral cleft lip nasal deformity. They will also be able to understand the aims and methods of primary surgical correction.

Continuing Education

Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through October 23, 2021.

  • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians
Original Seminar Date: October 23, 2019
On-Demand Release Date: October 24, 2019

Approved Credit:
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Anatomy of The Unilateral Cleft Nasal Deformity and Its Correction
    Collapse Audiology for The Cleft Palate Team: A Primer for Non-Audiologists

    It is well known that children with cleft palate and other craniofacial anomalies are at increased risk of hearing loss and ear disease, which if left undiagnosed or untreated can negatively impact speech and language performance, as well as academic and social development. While the Audiologist's role in providing regular assessment of hearing is both recognised and well documented within the ACPA's parameters of care documentation, the nature of the assessments conducted and the implications of the results are typically not well understood by other members of the cleft and/or craniofacial team.

    This webinar will provide a thorough overview of the comprehensive battery of hearing testing applicable to infants and children with cleft and/or craniofacial anomalies. The presentation will detail the appropriate tests to be used for children at different ages, including the clinical indications and contra-indications to performing these tests, as well as the test limitations. The presentation will also provide information on how attendees can best interpret hearing test results in their clinic, in order to better understand and treat patients in their care. The common "red-flags" for concern about a patient's hearing will also be discussed.

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit.  Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through May 15, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Introductory Level, Professional Area). 
    Original Seminar Date: May 15, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ASHA: 0.10 hours CEUs

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Audiology for The Cleft Palate Team: A Primer for Non-Audiologists
    Collapse Challenging Multilingual/Multicultural Cleft Cases in the US and Abroad

    This course will provide an overview of assessment and treatment of articulation and resonance in patients from diverse backgrounds, including refugees/recent immigrants, international adoptees, individuals from multilingual backgrounds, and those treated abroad. Case studies will be utilized to illustrate these areas.


    The presenters will describe the speech assessment process for individuals who do not speak the language of the examiner, including the importance of determining differences vs. disorder and the optimal use of interpreters. Surgical timing for individuals who are internationally adopted, considering both psycho-social and language-learning factors will be addressed for typical cases and for those where development has been significantly affected by orphanage time or other causes.


    Complications in surgical timing for individuals with migrant status, differing cultural beliefs about surgery, lack of early surgery, and/or access to speech therapy will also be addressed.

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through October 17, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Advanced Level, Professional Area).
    Original Seminar Date: October 17, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: October 18, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • NCNA: 1 hour Nursing Contact Hours
  • ASHA: 0.10 hours CEUs
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Challenging Multilingual/Multicultural Cleft Cases in the US and Abroad
    Collapse Cleft Orthognathic Surgery: Advanced Course Part 1
    Part 1

    Discuss treatment planning, stability, segmental osteotomies/bone grafting and speech considerations for patients with cleft lip/palate having orthognathic surgery. The learner will understand the surgical options and the effects of the operation on speech and stability.

     

    Part 2 of this webinar will be held in October 2019 and will discuss the orthodontic considerations of cleft orthognathic surgery. All participants who register for Part 1 will be enrolled in Part 2. 

     

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit.  Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through May 1, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    Original Seminar Date: May 01, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Cleft Orthognathic Surgery: Advanced Course Part 1
    Collapse Cleft Orthognathic Surgery: Advanced Course Part 2

    This course will review considerations of orthodontic planning, preparation and decompensation for orthognathic surgery as well orthodontic finishing and prosthodontic rehabilitation.  Topics include:

    ·    Review of terminology

    ·    Early and periodic tx plan “synchronizing” between Orthodontist and Surgeon

    ·    Cephalometric Analysis

    ·    Model Analysis

    ·    Facial analysis and treatment planning

    ·    2-D and 3D dental, facial, and skeletal treatment planning

    ·    Management of missing dentition

    ·    Surgery First

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit.  Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through October 9, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    Original Seminar Date: October 09, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: October 10, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Cleft Orthognathic Surgery: Advanced Course Part 2
    Collapse Clinical Audit for Psychosocial Outcome: Strategies for Identifying Families at Risk

    ACPA Standards of Care (ACPA) require that all Cleft and Craniofacial Teams have in place "a mechanism to initially and periodically assess and treat, as appropriate, the psychological and social needs of patients and families/caregivers and to refer for further treatment as necessary" (Standard 5.1). Standard 6 requires that "The Team uses a process to evaluate its own performance with regard to patient assessment, treatment, or satisfaction and to make improvements as a result of those evaluations." Meeting each of these criteria can pose a challenge to Cleft and Craniofacial Teams. The Mental Health Special Interest Group along with the Americleft Psychosocial Group are working together to provide information on strategies for psychosocial screening. The goal of this presentation is to enable Teams to meet Standard 5.1 by implementing standardized procedures for screening families for psychosocial risk. Since most Teams already have some screening mechanism in place, implementation of standardized screening methods would provide a mechanism to assess quality improvement by comparing the current method to a method using standardized screening procedures and thus meet Standard 6. 

    This course will first provide background information on the utility of a standardized method for screening for psychosocial risk. Methods for using clinical audit to compare current screening methods to a standardized approach will be discussed. Our second speaker will describe recommended instruments for risk screening and/or audit and provide some outcome data from a pilot quality assurance project and the Americleft project that document the value of using standardized instrumentation for screening. The third presenter will outline approaches that Teams can use to implement standardized screening into various Team formats. Finally, our last speaker will discuss how Teams can utilize the information generated from the screening process, to help provide brief interventions and link the patients and families with support services. 

     

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through July 17, 2021.

     

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    Original Seminar Date: July 17, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: July 18, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Clinical Audit for Psychosocial Outcome: Strategies for Identifying Families at Risk
    Collapse Controversies in Cleft Aveolar Bone Grafting

    Ideal rehabilitation of the alveolar cleft includes closure of the oronasal fistula, consolidation of the maxilla with good archform, eruption of the permanent dentition, ability to orthodontically expand or move teeth through the grafted site, and in some cases, creation of a sufficient bone stock to facilitate dental implant placement or prostatic rehabilitation. There is still controversy as to the timing of repair and of late, whether early secondary, or late secondary repair is the best option to fulfill all the above stated goals. Also, it is often noted the bone graft harvest site has a higher complication rate and creates more pain than the surgical site itself. Because of this, efforts have been made to find other grafting options, such as allograft and bone morphogenetic protein, as in equivalent to autogenous bone. The purpose of this 90 minute panel discussion is to educate the audience on controversial techniques for alveolar cleft bone grafting to be focused on timing of oral nasal fistula closure and types of bone graft in materials utilized.

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through December 11, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    Original Seminar Date: December 11, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Controversies in Cleft Aveolar Bone Grafting
    Collapse Demystifying Cleft Palate Speech: A Primer for the New SLP and Non-SLP Members of The Craniofacial Team

    Background and Purpose: Compensatory articulation errors are conventionally defined as speech errors that are made in response to velopharyngeal inadequacy (VPI) in which the articulatory constriction is below the velopharyngeal valve. It is an active strategy that the child uses to alter the place of articulation (i.e., level of the glottis and/or pharynx), while preserving the manner of articulation. Historically, glottal stops and pharyngeal stops, fricatives and affricates were considered to be clearly compensatory for VPI as the place of constriction clearly circumvents a defective velopharyngeal valve (McWilliams et al., 1984; Peterson-Falzone et al., 2010). 

    Over the years, additional "compensatory" articulation patterns presumably occurring as a consequence of VPI have been reported (e.g., Trost, 1981). These include mid-dorsum palatal stops, posterior nasal fricatives, and velar fricatives. However, all of these articulations – especially the mid-dorsum palatal stop – do not circumvent the velopharyngeal valve and thus do not meet the fundamental definition of a compensatory behavior. 

    In addition, recent evidence from empirical studies has led us to question whether the categorization of the mid-dorsum palatal stop and posterior nasal fricative as compensatory errors is appropriate. As noted above, the articulation or occlusion that occurs in the oral cavity during the production of these sounds does not circumvent the velopharyngeal mechanism. With respect to the mid-dorsum palatal stop, there is a growing body of research to suggest that the associated maladaptive articulation patterns may be unavoidable, in some cases, due to anterior structural defects such as collapsed or narrow maxillary arches (Zajac et al., 2012; Eshghi et al., 2013). Thus, this particular error may best be considered an obligatory oral distortion – similar to dental and/or lateral distortions of sibilants – that in some children with cleft palate may become phonemic over time. Young children without cleft palate also produce mid-dorsum palatal stops (Chapman and Hardin, 1992). As these authors have suggested, it is possible that this articulation reflects a developmental placement error, perhaps triggered by either subtle (non-clinical) palatal arch differences and/or reduced hearing. Relative to the latter, Shriberg et al. (2003) has reported evidence that children with histories of otitis media tend to back obstruent consonants. Clearly, children with cleft palate are at high, almost universal, risk of conductive hearing loss associated with otitis media. During the presentation, we will emphasize the need for studies that follow young, non-cleft children who exhibit mid-dorsum palatal stops longitudinally to elucidate the factors that may contribute to this articulation. 

    In the case of the posterior nasal fricative, the child "actively" attempts articulation of the fricative by occluding the oral cavity to direct all airflow through the nose (Harding and Grunwell, 1998). We have observed both aerodynamically and spectrographically that it is this oral airflow stopping gesture that differentiates nasal fricatives from passive (obligatory) audible and turbulent nasal air escape that may indeed sound similar in children with cleft palate. We will show examples of these similar sounding but different behaviors during the presentation. There is evidence, albeit limited, to suggest that most children with cleft palate who exhibit posterior nasal fricatives do not have VPI (Peterson-Falzone and Graham, 1990; Zajac and Vallino, 2015). As with mid-dorsum palatal stops, children without palatal anomalies also produce posterior nasal fricatives. Again, there is limited research to suggest that conductive hearing loss associated with otitis media may be a contributing factor in the development of this behavior (Peterson-Falzone and Graham, 1990; Morgan and Zajac, 2016; Zajac, 2018). Zajac (2015, 2018) has hypothesized that conductive hearing loss is the triggering event in children both with and without cleft palate. The overall goal for this webinar is to introduce to the SLP and other team members to the types of resonance, nasal emission (both obligatory and learned as part of nasal fricatives), and articulation problems that are commonly encountered in the clinic. We will present a practical and evidence-based framework for describing resonance and nasal air emission characteristics and discriminating between obligatory errors and traditionally defined compensatory articulation errors.

    Content: This session will include descriptions and definitions of speech problems often present in individuals with cleft palate. This includes an overview of resonance problems. Nasal air emission will be presented from a framework of obligatory versus learned. Obligatory nasal air emission and obligatory turbulence (rustle) due to velopharyngeal (VP) dysfunction will be differentiated from anterior nasal fricatives and posterior nasal fricatives, respectively, that occurs as learned articulation errors. We will illustrate the use of oral-nasal audio recordings via the Nasometer as an "off label" procedure to identify and spectrally define both types of behaviors. We will also present a practical and evidence-based framework for describing and categorizing articulation errors according to place of production primarily-within and outside the oral cavity- and type of production (obligatory vs. compensatory) secondarily. We will present evidence to show that some traditionally defined compensatory errors such as the mid-dorsum palatal stop may be better defined as an obligatory distortion in many cases. We will also discuss treatment ramifications of such a reclassification. 

    Conclusion: Articulation errors in individuals with cleft palate are common. Some errors are obligatory, occurring as a direct consequence of VP dysfunction and structural conditions such as dental/occlusal defects. Other errors are learned, and in some cases may be compensatory in that the pattern of errors are made to circumvent the VP valve. Still others produce other types of errors that are unusual (e.g., posterior nasal fricatives) that do not easily fit into these categories. Based on the current evidence, a reclassification of some articulation errors traditionally considered as compensatory is suggested. Best practice is centered on the SLP's thorough understanding of these problems and causative factors. 

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through July 3, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate Level, Professional Area).
    • NCNA/ANCC (pre approval): This continuing nursing education activity was approved by the North Carolina Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. To receive contact hours nurses must attend 80% of this CNE activity and complete the online evaluation. Enduring material will be available thorugh On-demand Access for up to two years after the Live Webcast date.
    Original Seminar Date: July 03, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ASHA: 0.10 hours CEUs
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • NCNA: 1 hour Nursing Contact Hours
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Demystifying Cleft Palate Speech: A Primer for the New SLP and Non-SLP Members of The Craniofacial Team
    Collapse Ethical Considerations in Advertising Cleft and Craniofacial Care Services

    Internet and social media platforms are routinely used to advertise and communicate cleft/craniofacial team services and foster community among patients with a craniofacial difference. United States based teams have widely adopted the technology to market their expertise, and international surgery groups routinely use social media to engage a broad demographic in their work; both US based teams and international surgery groups use the platforms to fund raise. While photos on websites and social media lend themselves to lay person communication, out of context photos of patients with a craniofacial difference that do not adhere to standards of medical photography can be sensationalist and potentially damaging to the dignity of the patient.

     

    The purpose of this interactive session is to review the ethical considerations in advertising cleft/craniofacial team services in both the US and for international surgery groups based on principles of the Helsinki Accords and concepts of informed consent, review and discuss de-identified advertising samples and discuss initiatives among craniofacial patient advocacy groups to change how patients are portrayed. At the end of this session, learners will be able to identify 3 core ethical considerations in advertising cleft/craniofacial team services in both the US and for international surgery groups, discuss efforts of patient advocacy groups for more patient centered and patient positive images, and apply these principles themselves in creating web based and social media communications. 

     

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through November 6, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate Level, Professional Area).
    Original Seminar Date: November 06, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ASHA: 0.10 hours CEUs
  • NCNA: 1 hour Nursing Contact Hours

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Ethical Considerations in Advertising Cleft and Craniofacial Care Services
    Collapse Hemifacial Microsomia: An Interdisciplinary Integrated Approach to Care

    This webinar will provide a comprehensive discussion on managing the child with hemifacial microsomia/craniofacial microsomia (HFM) from birth through adulthood. Each of our professional specialists – anaplastologist, audiologist, nurse coordinator, orthodontist, surgeon, psychologist, speech pathologist and surgeon - will provide expert opinion on the integrated multidisciplinary approach that includes not only dento-skeletal and soft tissue reconstruction, but also the equally important components of audiology, speech and psychological support essential for successful treatment outcomes.

     

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through August 15, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate Level, Professional Area).
    • NCNA/ANCC (pre approval): This activity has been submitted to the North Carolina Nurses Association for approval to award contact hours. North Carolina Nurses Association is accredited as an approver of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. To receive contact hours nurses must attend 80% of this CNE activity. 
    Original Seminar Date: August 15, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: August 16, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ASHA: 0.10 hours CEUs
  • NCNA: 1 hour Nursing Contact Hours

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Hemifacial Microsomia: An Interdisciplinary Integrated Approach to Care
    Collapse Management Gastrointestinal and Feeding Issues in the 22q Deletion Syndrome Population

    This webinar will provide a comprehensive discussion on the gastrointestinal and feeding manifestations seen in 22q DS.  A case will be discussed to illustrate key points.  Material covered will include the incident, pathophysiology, clinial manifestations, evaluation, treatment and complications,

     

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through September 4, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate Level, Professional Area).

    Neither the speakers nor members of the planning committee have any conflicts of interest related to the content of this activity.  Individual disclosures may be found in the “Topics” tab under their name.

    Original Seminar Date: September 04, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: September 05, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ASHA: 0.10 hours CEUs

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Management Gastrointestinal and Feeding Issues in the 22q Deletion Syndrome Population
    Collapse Managing Cleft Care in the Middle East: Avoiding Missteps and Misconceptions

    The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) have a combined population of 700 million with an annual birth of at least 14,000 patients with clefts. Given the political turmoil in the region, there are multiple subpopulations, where even the most rudimentary pieces of cleft care are not present, suggesting that the numbers of untreated, or inadequately treated, patients have already out-pacing the capacity of regional providers to care for these patients. This presentation will 1) Assess the cleft landscape of MENA, 2) Provide an overview of current work being done in the region, 3) Identify potential solutions to the shortfalls of current strategies, 4) Develop mechanisms to improve the quality of cleft care delivered in the region, and 5) Provide a roadmap for future regionalization of cleft care.

    Strategies for building cleft care capacity in MENA must start with individual volunteer trips, then grows to incorporate local team development, and must also broaden into regional strategies to improve access to care for patients with clefts and their families. When preparing for individual volunteer trips, the following scheme is utilized: 1) Pre-screening of hospital capacities including the presence of an intensive care unit, 2) Clear communication with local partners, 3) Pre-operative evaluation of all patients by all team members, including, but not limited to, pediatricians, anesthesiologists, speech and language pathologists, and surgeons; 4) Clear decision making that the operation for each child is the correct operation at the right time, 5) Standard algorithms for care pre-, intra-, and post-operatively; 6) Appropriate monitoring of patients during recovery and through discharge, 7) Timely discharge with appropriate follow-up, 8) Routine re-evaluation of the quality of outcomes; 9) Developing a standard process for morbidity and mortality discussions, 10) Identifying metrics for outcomes, including, but not limited to, quality of lip repair, adequacy of bone grafting, and speech outcomes, and 11) Instituting a database to track these metrics. Individual volunteer trips must transition to local team development. These teams should conduct their cleft work with algorithms that emphasize safety and high-quality outcomes. This work must then transition to identification of regional centers where cleft care may best be delivered, and to develop mechanisms for these reginal centers to communicate with each other in order to develop an overall strategy for MENA. The co-authors will present the results of a combined 45 years' experience with cleft work in MENA, and share insights about how to address these methodological items, all with the intent of improving cleft care within MENA. In sum, sustainable improvements in cleft care must start with safety, attention to detail, a strong will to teach, and providing local and regional strategies to improve cleft care in MENA.

    Original Seminar Date: June 07, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
    MORE INFOMORE INFO Managing Cleft Care in the Middle East: Avoiding Missteps and Misconceptions
    Collapse Multi-Team Experiences of Care Coordination

    Care coordination of a child with a cleft or craniofacial abnormality is multifaceted and at times complicated. Topics of discussion will include 1) the prenatal visit with team providers and preparing couples for the birth of their baby, 2) feeding protocol for infants with a cleft, 3) serving a culturally diverse population, and 4) working with interdisciplinary team members to deliver comprehensive care to medically complex children/families with cleft and craniofacial diagnoses.

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through November 14, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    Original Seminar Date: November 14, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: November 15, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • NCNA: 1 hour Nursing Contact Hours

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Multi-Team Experiences of Care Coordination
    Collapse Rebroadcast - Cleft Palate Speech Therapy: From Elicitation to Spontaneous Speech

    Children with cleft palate (CP) and/or velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) often present with complex speech sound disorders. While surgery can facilitate a functional mechanism for the child to use, only speech therapy can correct the complex learned speech sound errors. The therapeutic process may be slow and labor intensive, requiring multiple years until normalization is achieved. There is no "therapy cookbook" that covers the diverse needs of the children with cleft or VPD, and what works for one child may not work for the next. Once a speech sound target has been elicited, the greatest challenge is habituating the sound in appropriate linguistic and phonemic contexts in the child's spontaneous speech. Failure of habituation results in impaired intelligibility and social stigma for the child. 

    This course is designed for working clinicians in search of techniques for teaching and habituating consonants, or for those who teach or supervise clinicians in training, and is intended to be a forum for the exchange of ideas for speech therapy. It is presented by a panel of five speech pathologists who evaluate and treat children with cleft and VPD. An overview of motor learning theory will begin the study session, followed by individual and varied case studies in elicitation and habituation of particular phoneme targets. 

     

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit.  Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through July 11, 2020.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate Level, Professional Area).
    Original Seminar Date: April 23, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ASHA: 1 hour CEUs

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Rebroadcast - Cleft Palate Speech Therapy: From Elicitation to Spontaneous Speech
    Collapse The Importance of Early Identification and Treatment of Deformational Plagiocephaly/Brachycephaly and Congenital Muscular Torticollis

    Deformational plagiocephaly/brachycephaly (DPB) occurs in 16-19% of babies and 70-95% of these babies also have congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). Current theories state that the CMT occurs in the womb due to “packaging” causing the baby to develop a preferred position of turning their head in the opposite direction of the CMT. The skull is very soft and malleable; therefore, a preferred position often results in flattening and anteriorly displaces the ear, forehead and cheek. Although many families and PCP’s identify this issue at 1 or 2 months of age, the families are often told that DPB will resolve once the baby is rolling and sitting. Parents are very discouraged when this does not occur. Early intervention with conservative measures to include aggressive repositioning and physical therapy can be very effective. At our center, we have a team clinic with a nurse practitioner and a physical therapist seeing the patients referred for plagiocephaly/torticollis. The babies are evaluated for both diagnoses and treatment is initiated immediately often halting and/or reversing the progression and negating the need for helmet therapy.  

    Original Seminar Date: March 14, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now
    MORE INFOMORE INFO The Importance of Early Identification and Treatment of Deformational Plagiocephaly/Brachycephaly and Congenital Muscular Torticollis
    Collapse The Oral Examination: Normal and Abnormal Findings. Better Diagnostic Abilities for Children with Craniofacial Disorders

    This webinar will be helpful for all team members involved in diagnosis and treatment of craniofacial conditions.  Anyone who regularly performs oral assessment and therapy (speech pathologists, dentists, physicians, nursing professionals, nutrition professionals, occupational therapists, etc.)  should find this session beneficial.  This presentation should give any team member who performs oral evaluations more information and tools to recognize common and abnormal oral conditions, understand management, and provide proper referral if needed.

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through August 29, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate Level, Professional Area).
    • NCNA/ANCC (pre approval): This activity has been submitted to the North Carolina Nurses Association for approval to award contact hours. North Carolina Nurses Association is accredited as an approver of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. To receive contact hours nurses must attend 80% of this CNE activity. 

     

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through August 29, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    • ASHA: This program is offered for 0.10 ASHA CEUs (Intermediate Level, Professional Area).
    • NCNA/ANCC (pre approval): This activity will be submitted to the North Carolina Nurses Association for approval to award contact hours. North Carolina Nurses Association is accredited as an approver of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. To receive contact hours nurses must attend 80% of this CNE activity. 

    Neither the speakers nor members of the planning committee have any conflicts of interest related to the content of this activity.  Individual disclosures may be found in the "Topics" tab under their name. 

    Original Seminar Date: August 29, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: August 30, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ASHA: 0.10 hours CEUs
  • NCNA: 1 hour Nursing Contact Hours

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO The Oral Examination: Normal and Abnormal Findings. Better Diagnostic Abilities for Children with Craniofacial Disorders
    Collapse Transition of Care for Young Adults with Cleft Lip and Palate: We

    Background and purpose: For many young adults with cleft lip and palate (CLP), traditional team services come to an abrupt end at age 18, necessitating a transition from child-centered to adult-centered care. There is a shift in focus from the cleft itself and clinician reported outcomes to patient self-report about the perceived impact of the cleft. Transition also befalls the parents and team providers. We propose an evidence-based person-centered delivery model of care using the concepts of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) (WHO, 2001, 2004). The ICF represents a shift from health condition and body impairment-centered descriptions of disability to a more comprehensive documentation, including a wider range of functionality indicators. This model of Transition of Care is proposed to facilitate a positive shift from pediatric to adult-centered care. It is timely for teams to embrace the concept of transition of care, and to provide services that recognize the importance of personal and environmental factors in facilitating holistic transition planning and service delivery (ICF, WHO, 2001), which are developmentally appropriate to young adults with CLP (Farre & McDonagh, 2017; Farre et al., 2016).
    The purpose of this proposed evidence based model is to provide a framework for redesigning the way services are delivered to a young adult with CLP. The concepts of this model are relevant to all specialists on the cleft palate team. The aim of this presentation is to create an awareness of young adults with CL/P who are generally a neglected population in terms of team care and to suggest a new and fresh approach to service delivery to these individuals with the emphasis on clinical resources.

    Content: A brief overview of adolescents and young adults with CLP and their multidisciplinary needs will be presented. A framework for a holistic service delivery model developed by Vallino and Louw (2017) will be presented. We will suggest strategies for teams to improve the care for young adults with CLP and share a clinical toolbox comprised of a compendium of resources.
    Conclusion: The proposed Service Delivery Model for young adults with CLP necessitates a change in perspective that embraces constructs such as person-centered care in order to ensure the best outcomes for these individuals. These concepts can be applied by all cleft palate team members. Adopting a life span perspective reinforces the understanding that living with and managing CLP is dynamic and that transition is a process rather than a point in a person's life. 

    Continuing Education

    Attendees must register, attend and evaluate each webinar to receive continuing education credit. Presenter disclosures can be found in the "Topics" tab in the speaker bio. This course will be available on-demand through December 4, 2021.

    • ACCME: ACPA designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™.  Physicians should only claim credits commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
    Original Seminar Date: December 04, 2019
    On-Demand Release Date: December 05, 2019

    Approved Credit:
  • ACCME (non-MD/DO): 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)
  • ACCME: 1 hour AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)

  • MORE INFOMORE INFO Transition of Care for Young Adults with Cleft Lip and Palate: We